THE FARMS AROUND CUMWHINTON

 

Cumwhinton is a small rural village to the south of Carlisle and has always relied on agriculture for its main employment.

The agricultural history of the village and area has not been published and the following are a few examples of farming related topics I have found to date and details of some of the farms.

 

MURRAIN

Murrain was the term used during the medieval period for any cattle or sheep disease that occurred as an epidemic and caused a large number of deaths. Murrain literally means death. These diseases included Anthrax, Foot and Mouth, Rinderpest. By the nineteenth century it was usually applied only to Rinderpest which is a viral disease of ungulatrs which causes fever, loss of mucous in the mouth and diarrhoea and is usually fatal. The disease was eradicated from the UK in the alte 19th Century.

In the Carlisle Journal 6th July 1844 there is a report that Mr Dodd of Cumwhinton has lost 6 cows due to Murrain.

 

 

THE CRINGLES

 

Situated on the road to Carlisle to the north of the village

 

CRINGLESTITHE

 

 

Cumwhinton tithe map showing the site of the Cringles (1842) B16.

 

 

The house is early 19th century in coursed red sandstone with a slate roof. There is  windows allong the front with moulded window dressings. The front door has 2 tuscan columns and moulded entabulative.

 

The tithe map has Henry Aglionby Aglionby as the owner with Robert Lennox as the tennant. Piggs map of 1838 has the farm as freehold under the Aglionby family.

 

The 1847 mannix and Whellan directory still has Robert Lennox as the occupier.

 

The farm was advertised for sale in January 1855 when John Pattinson had been the tennant. The farm is both arable and grassland and woodland and is 65 acres in area.

 

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Advert from Carlisle journal 23rd November 1855

 

This shows that John Pattinson was still tennant in the November. However another advert shows that development was planned to take place.

 

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Advert Carlisle Journal 2nd November 1855.

 

 

James Stewart was the new owner

 

cringlejohnstewart321865JPG

 

 

Advert Carlisle Journal 3rd February 1865.

 

James Stewart sold the farm in 1865

 

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Advert Carlisle Journal 16th February 1865.

 

 

Mr W C Snowden obviously retired in 1877 and the farm was re-let.

 

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Advert Carlisle Journal 23rd February 1877.

 

 

The 1882 directory shows jonathan Armstrong as resident.

 

By 1934 William Haugh was the farmer.

 

 

WRAGMIRE BANK

 

Earliest mention to date is an advert for sale in1784

 

wragmire-bank23111784

 

 

CUMBERLAND PAQUET 23RD NOVEMBER 1784.

 

 

Note the spelling.

 

The farm was for sale again in 1799

 

wragmirebank1161799

 

 

 CUMBERLAND PAQUET 11TH JUNE 1799.

 

An advert in the Carisle Journal of 3rd September 1814 have both Wragmire Bank and Wath Green for sale again. The tennant is Mrs Brown.  (microfilm in Carlisle library to poor to reproduce here)

 

 

Possibly at this sale the farm became part of Barrock Lodge Estate, and is shown in a field book of the state for 1819 as being in the occupation of James Brough.

 

There is also a field plan for the farm 1839 and a list of crops grown for each field.

 

(CRO D/JB/3/1 + 2)

 

WRAG-MAP

 

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On the Cumwhinton Tithe Map, 1842, the owner is William James and tennant is Joseph Brough.

 

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